• Problematic Behavior:

    Click on a topic for quick tips on how to deal with problematic behaviors

     


       Hyperactive
     
     
     Poor Social Skills  

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

               

     
    NONCOMPLIANCE:
     
    For some children non-compliancy can be an obstacle to learning. Children who engage in non-compliant       behaviors can also disrupt the learning of others.  Classroom teachers facing non-compliant learners must find effective strategies for engaging these learning in instruction and routine without disruptive behaviors.
     
    TRY THIS:
     

    Catch kids being good.  Praise immediately.

    Know studentπs ability level; make sure materials match

    Clearly state rules & consequences. Be consistent.

    Do not embarrass student in front of peers.

    State request in "Do" form, not "Do not."

    Use nonverbal communication.

    Reward with snacks & breaks

    Reward good faith attempts.

    Stay near student.

    Repeat directions.

    Treat with respect

     

    SMILE

     

    Back To Top

     

     

     

     

     

        

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

             

     
    OPPOSITIONAL, DEFIANT:
     
    Some children engage in extreme non-compliant and defiant behaviors and are difficult to motivate to engage in daily routines and instruction.  These populations of learners have more intense behavioral needs and require specialized strategies to assist in breaking down walls of defiant behaviors and building relationships.
     
    TRY THIS:
     

    Display clear, simple set of rules. Review them with class.

    Avoid conflict & de-escalate: change subject, walk away.

    Be consistent with rules, rewards, & consequences.

    Say "nevertheless, this is how it is going to be..." &

    Repeat in calm, emotionless tone over & over.

    Maintain consistency with daily schedule

    Praise & reward flexibility & cooperation

    Give choices in lieu of demands.

    Manage your own stress (time-outs).

    Do not defend yourself.

    Donπt take it personally

     

    DON'T GIVE UP

     

     

    Back To Top

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

       

     
    ACTING OUT, AGGRESSIVE, NON-COMPLIANT:
     
    Some children engage in behaviors which escalate beyond non-compliancy to physically or verbally acting out behaviors.  These behaviors are more intense and many times develop into moments in which the child becomes a threat to him or her self or others. These behaviors require specialized strategies to assist in de-escalating intensive, problematic behaviors while building relationships, and teaching emotional regulation skills to the learner
     
    TRY THIS:
     

    Show personal interest in student; spend time 1-on-1.

    Praise good behavior, kindness and courtesy

    Post list of simple, clear classroom rules.

    Contract: expected behavior/rewards and consequences.

    Incorporate large muscle activities in lessons.

    Show consistency, acceptance & warmth

    Assign a project instead of a test

    Reprimand privately.

    Use "I" statements.

    Do not argue

    Keep student busy.

     

    STAY CALM

     


    Back To Top

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    POOR ATTENTION:
     

    Difficulties with attending to classroom instruction can be a major obstacle to learning. Children with poor attending skills can benefit from basic classroom strategies and modifications to classroom environments. Strategies can be developed within the classroom to increase attending in children with attentional deficits.

     
    TRY THIS:
     

    Know student's reading level; adjust materials to match

    Provide a red flair pen to help the student focus on work.

    Stand by student when giving class directions.

    Touch studentπs shoulder, point to work to refocus

    Use simple, clear words to explain a concept

    Seat student near front, near teacher

    Interact with student every 5 minutes.

    Give short, clear directions.

    Provide a study carrel

    Highlight main points.

    Limit distracters.

     

                EYE CONTACT


    For more info.
    Click on the ADHD Button

     


    Back To Top

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


        

     
    LACKS INTEREST:
     
    Some children seem unmotivated or difficult to engage in instruction and classroom routines because of a lack of interest in participation.  Lack of participating and motivation to engage in the learning process can be an obstacle to learning for some children. Specific interventions can assist in developing motivated learners.
     
    TRY THIS:
     

    Know student's ability level; adjust materials to match

    Contract: expected behavior/rewards & consequences.

    Stand near student when giving instructions

    Show an interest in student – ask his opinion

    Spend time one-on-one with student

    Call or visit home & give good reports

    Do not criticize when correcting

    Communicate with counselor & nurse

    Do not embarrass student

    Reward displays of interest

    Be supportive

     

    LISTEN

     

     


    Back To Top

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    HYPERACTIVE:
     

    Some children have difficulty engaging in instruction and appropriate social skills related to issues with hyperactive behaviors. Strategies can be developed within the classroom to assist learners with hyperactivity to regulate, attend, and engage in appropriate behaviors.

     
    TRY THIS:
     

    Provide consistency and structure

    Frequent interaction; use studentπs name often

    Teach with games, use computer games

    Incorporate movement every 10 minutes into lessons

    Prepare student for unstructured times         

    Have snacks available

    Use row seating

    Use timers

    Clearly define expectations

    Frequent reminder of rules

    Allow wiggle time

    Use nonverbal signals

     

    BE POSITIVE


    For more info.
    Click on the ADHD Button

     


    Back To Top

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

               

     
    DOES NOT HAVE FRIENDS:
     
    Some learners demonstrate poor social skills with peers and adults as a result of a developmental disability or lack of appropriate models and experiences. For these children, social skills must be directly taught. Interventions can be developed to assist children develop these skills in and out of the classroom setting.
     
    TRY THIS:
     

    Directly teach & provide daily practice in courtesy

    Pair student with a friendly, nonthreatening study partner

    Provide personal & class recognition for successes

    Praise & reward positive group participation

    Help student develop a skill peers will praise

    Provide opportunities to take turns

    Directly teach friendship skills

    Teach the golden rule

    Model friendship

    Speak quietly

               

    ENCOURAGE

     

     

     


    Back To Top

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    FREQUENTLY SAD:
     

    Children who engage in frequently sad behavior can benefit from strategic evaluation and interventions from educational staff. Early identification of variables contributing to sad behavior in a child can assist in stimulating learning as well as deterring other potential roadblocks to learning.

     
    TRY THIS:
     

    Talk with student. Show genuine concern

    Provide a "safe zone", a quiet, nonthreatening area

    Create opportunities for positive interactions

    Keep a journal narrating student's behaviors

    Respect studentπs right to privacy

    Share concerns with administrator

    Discuss with school counselor

    Report self-injurious threats

    Conference with parents

    Encourage friendships

    Be supportive

               

    OBSERVE

     

     


    Back To Top

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

               

     
    SUDDEN CHANGE IN BEHAVIOR:
     

    Some children demonstrate sudden changes in behavior which can disrupt learning and child progress. Sudden changes in behavior can occur for many different reasons and should be evaluated and problem-solved on early. Early identification of variables contributing to the sudden changes in behavior can assist in managing problematic behaviors.

     
    TRY THIS:
     

    Listen to the student. Show genuine interest & respect

    Allow student opportunities to share problems

    Recognize student often (say "Hello" in halls, etc...)

    Parent conference: ask about medical concerns

    Report severe changes immediately

    Share concerns with administrator

    Discuss with school counselor

    Provide success oriented tasks

    Provide writing or art journal

    Maintain confidentiality

    Monitor attendance

               

    EYE CONTACT

     

     


    Back To Top

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

              

     
    POOR SOCIAL SKILLS:
     
    Some learners demonstrate poor social skills with peers and adults as a result of a developmental disability or lack of appropriate models and experiences. For these children, social skills must be directly taught. Interventions can be developed to assist children develop these skills in and out of the classroom setting.
     
    TRY THIS:
     

    Directly teach normal, age-appropriate social responses

    Reward pro-social behavior immediately & OFTEN

    Teach conversation skill during small group activities

    Use positive approach – encourage at all times

    Reinforce other students who behave well

    Remind student how to behave appropriately

    Practice/role-play classroom courtesy

    Create opportunities for success

    Teach active listening skills

    Model the desired behavior

    Use eye contact

               

    SMILE

     

     


    Back To Top

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    ACTING OUT, NONCOMPLIANT:
     
    Some children engage in behaviors which escalate beyond non-compliancy to physically or verbally acting out behaviors.  These behaviors are more intense and many times develop into moments in which the child becomes a threat to him or her self or others. These behaviors require specialized strategies to assist in de-escalating intensive, problematic behaviors while building relationships, and teaching emotional regulation skills to the learner
     
    TRY THIS:
     

    Make sure student can actually decode the instructional material

    Privately & calmly discuss behavior with student

    Do not ask "Why" or take a threatening stance

    Make sure student knows behavior rules

    Provide an incentive for positive behaviors

    Show appreciation for small successes

    Reinforce positive social behaviors

    Conference with administrator

    Expect small, slow changes

    Involve counselor

    Show acceptance

     

    BUILD TRUST

     

     


    Back To Top

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

          

     
    DISORGANIZED:
     
    Children who are frequently disorganized and have difficulty planning or preparing for tasks can experience difficulty functioning independently in the classroom. Many times setting up specific strategies and teaching new skills can assist in these children functioning more independently in the classroom.
     
    TRY THIS:
     

    Provide structure and consistency with daily routine

    Directly teach organizational skills every day

    Preferential seating, make sure student can see you

    Help student keep materials in a specific place

    Help student keep daily & weekly goals list

    Provide assignment notebook

    Give clear, specific directions

    Teach unspoken social rules

    Reward small successes

    Reduce distractions

    Use a timer

     

    BE CONSISTENT

     


    Back To Top

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

Problematic Behavior:

Click on a topic for quick tips on how to deal with problematic behaviors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

           

 
NONCOMPLIANCE:
 
For some children non-compliancy can be an obstacle to learning. Children who engage in non-compliant       behaviors can also disrupt the learning of others.  Classroom teachers facing non-compliant learners must find effective strategies for engaging these learning in instruction and routine without disruptive behaviors.
 
TRY THIS:
 

Catch kids being good.  Praise immediately.

Know studentπs ability level; make sure materials match

Clearly state rules & consequences. Be consistent.

Do not embarrass student in front of peers.

State request in "Do" form, not "Do not."

Use nonverbal communication.

Reward with snacks & breaks

Reward good faith attempts.

Stay near student.

Repeat directions.

Treat with respect

 

SMILE

 

Back To Top

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

          

 
OPPOSITIONAL, DEFIANT:
 
Some children engage in extreme non-compliant and defiant behaviors and are difficult to motivate to engage in daily routines and instruction.  These populations of learners have more intense behavioral needs and require specialized strategies to assist in breaking down walls of defiant behaviors and building relationships.
 
TRY THIS:
 

Display clear, simple set of rules. Review them with class.

Avoid conflict & de-escalate: change subject, walk away.

Be consistent with rules, rewards, & consequences.

Say "nevertheless, this is how it is going to be..." &

Repeat in calm, emotionless tone over & over.

Maintain consistency with daily schedule

Praise & reward flexibility & cooperation

Give choices in lieu of demands.

Manage your own stress (time-outs).

Do not defend yourself.

Donπt take it personally

 

DON'T GIVE UP

 

 

Back To Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 
ACTING OUT, AGGRESSIVE, NON-COMPLIANT:
 
Some children engage in behaviors which escalate beyond non-compliancy to physically or verbally acting out behaviors.  These behaviors are more intense and many times develop into moments in which the child becomes a threat to him or her self or others. These behaviors require specialized strategies to assist in de-escalating intensive, problematic behaviors while building relationships, and teaching emotional regulation skills to the learner
 
TRY THIS:
 

Show personal interest in student; spend time 1-on-1.

Praise good behavior, kindness and courtesy

Post list of simple, clear classroom rules.

Contract: expected behavior/rewards and consequences.

Incorporate large muscle activities in lessons.

Show consistency, acceptance & warmth

Assign a project instead of a test

Reprimand privately.

Use "I" statements.

Do not argue

Keep student busy.

 

STAY CALM

 


Back To Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
POOR ATTENTION:
 

Difficulties with attending to classroom instruction can be a major obstacle to learning. Children with poor attending skills can benefit from basic classroom strategies and modifications to classroom environments. Strategies can be developed within the classroom to increase attending in children with attentional deficits.

 
TRY THIS:
 

Know student's reading level; adjust materials to match

Provide a red flair pen to help the student focus on work.

Stand by student when giving class directions.

Touch studentπs shoulder, point to work to refocus

Use simple, clear words to explain a concept

Seat student near front, near teacher

Interact with student every 5 minutes.

Give short, clear directions.

Provide a study carrel

Highlight main points.

Limit distracters.

 

            EYE CONTACT


For more info.
Click on the ADHD Button

 


Back To Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


    

 
LACKS INTEREST:
 
Some children seem unmotivated or difficult to engage in instruction and classroom routines because of a lack of interest in participation.  Lack of participating and motivation to engage in the learning process can be an obstacle to learning for some children. Specific interventions can assist in developing motivated learners.
 
TRY THIS:
 

Know student's ability level; adjust materials to match

Contract: expected behavior/rewards & consequences.

Stand near student when giving instructions

Show an interest in student – ask his opinion

Spend time one-on-one with student

Call or visit home & give good reports

Do not criticize when correcting

Communicate with counselor & nurse

Do not embarrass student

Reward displays of interest

Be supportive

 

LISTEN

 

 


Back To Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
HYPERACTIVE:
 

Some children have difficulty engaging in instruction and appropriate social skills related to issues with hyperactive behaviors. Strategies can be developed within the classroom to assist learners with hyperactivity to regulate, attend, and engage in appropriate behaviors.

 
TRY THIS:
 

Provide consistency and structure

Frequent interaction; use studentπs name often

Teach with games, use computer games

Incorporate movement every 10 minutes into lessons

Prepare student for unstructured times         

Have snacks available

Use row seating

Use timers

Clearly define expectations

Frequent reminder of rules

Allow wiggle time

Use nonverbal signals

 

BE POSITIVE


For more info.
Click on the ADHD Button

 


Back To Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

           

 
DOES NOT HAVE FRIENDS:
 
Some learners demonstrate poor social skills with peers and adults as a result of a developmental disability or lack of appropriate models and experiences. For these children, social skills must be directly taught. Interventions can be developed to assist children develop these skills in and out of the classroom setting.
 
TRY THIS:
 

Directly teach & provide daily practice in courtesy

Pair student with a friendly, nonthreatening study partner

Provide personal & class recognition for successes

Praise & reward positive group participation

Help student develop a skill peers will praise

Provide opportunities to take turns

Directly teach friendship skills

Teach the golden rule

Model friendship

Speak quietly

           

ENCOURAGE

 

 

 


Back To Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
FREQUENTLY SAD:
 

Children who engage in frequently sad behavior can benefit from strategic evaluation and interventions from educational staff. Early identification of variables contributing to sad behavior in a child can assist in stimulating learning as well as deterring other potential roadblocks to learning.

 
TRY THIS:
 

Talk with student. Show genuine concern

Provide a "safe zone", a quiet, nonthreatening area

Create opportunities for positive interactions

Keep a journal narrating student's behaviors

Respect studentπs right to privacy

Share concerns with administrator

Discuss with school counselor

Report self-injurious threats

Conference with parents

Encourage friendships

Be supportive

           

OBSERVE

 

 


Back To Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

           

 
SUDDEN CHANGE IN BEHAVIOR:
 

Some children demonstrate sudden changes in behavior which can disrupt learning and child progress. Sudden changes in behavior can occur for many different reasons and should be evaluated and problem-solved on early. Early identification of variables contributing to the sudden changes in behavior can assist in managing problematic behaviors.

 
TRY THIS:
 

Listen to the student. Show genuine interest & respect

Allow student opportunities to share problems

Recognize student often (say "Hello" in halls, etc...)

Parent conference: ask about medical concerns

Report severe changes immediately

Share concerns with administrator

Discuss with school counselor

Provide success oriented tasks

Provide writing or art journal

Maintain confidentiality

Monitor attendance

           

EYE CONTACT

 

 


Back To Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

          

 
POOR SOCIAL SKILLS:
 
Some learners demonstrate poor social skills with peers and adults as a result of a developmental disability or lack of appropriate models and experiences. For these children, social skills must be directly taught. Interventions can be developed to assist children develop these skills in and out of the classroom setting.
 
TRY THIS:
 

Directly teach normal, age-appropriate social responses

Reward pro-social behavior immediately & OFTEN

Teach conversation skill during small group activities

Use positive approach – encourage at all times

Reinforce other students who behave well

Remind student how to behave appropriately

Practice/role-play classroom courtesy

Create opportunities for success

Teach active listening skills

Model the desired behavior

Use eye contact

           

SMILE

 

 


Back To Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
ACTING OUT, NONCOMPLIANT:
 
Some children engage in behaviors which escalate beyond non-compliancy to physically or verbally acting out behaviors.  These behaviors are more intense and many times develop into moments in which the child becomes a threat to him or her self or others. These behaviors require specialized strategies to assist in de-escalating intensive, problematic behaviors while building relationships, and teaching emotional regulation skills to the learner
 
TRY THIS:
 

Make sure student can actually decode the instructional material

Privately & calmly discuss behavior with student

Do not ask "Why" or take a threatening stance

Make sure student knows behavior rules

Provide an incentive for positive behaviors

Show appreciation for small successes

Reinforce positive social behaviors

Conference with administrator

Expect small, slow changes

Involve counselor

Show acceptance

 

BUILD TRUST

 

 


Back To Top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      

 
DISORGANIZED:
 
Children who are frequently disorganized and have difficulty planning or preparing for tasks can experience difficulty functioning independently in the classroom. Many times setting up specific strategies and teaching new skills can assist in these children functioning more independently in the classroom.
 
TRY THIS:
 

Provide structure and consistency with daily routine

Directly teach organizational skills every day

Preferential seating, make sure student can see you

Help student keep materials in a specific place

Help student keep daily & weekly goals list

Provide assignment notebook

Give clear, specific directions

Teach unspoken social rules

Reward small successes

Reduce distractions

Use a timer

 

BE CONSISTENT

 


Back To Top